Proposal Categories

Conference informationTypes of proposalsStrand descriptionsProposal rubric

Paper Presentations

Paper presentations give students the opportunity to share their research findings on a panel with 2-3 other students who generally share similar research topics. Students present their research via a 12-14 minute oral presentation. All presentations are welcome, but presentations that relate to the conference theme are preferred. Students must identify the appropriate strand, listed below.

  • Business, Economics & Technology
  • Education
  • History, Politics, & Culture
  • Language, Literature, & Philosophy
  • Mathematics, Sciences, & Health
  • Media and the Arts
  • Social Sciences (Sociology, Anthropology, Archeology, Geography, and Jurisprudence)
  • Honors Education and Practices

Please read the detailed strand descriptions and the theme statement carefully before writing your proposal.

Poster Presentations

Poster presentations provide an opportunity for students to present their research and findings one-on-one or to a small group. Presentations from all disciplines are welcome. Students present their research on a tri-fold poster board, measuring 48×36 inches. This year, students will also be asked to designate the strand their work belongs in.

  • Business, Economics & Technology
  • Education
  • History, Politics, & Culture
  • Language, Literature, & Philosophy
  • Mathematics, Sciences, & Health
  • Media and the Arts
  • Social Sciences (Sociology, Anthropology, Archeology, Geography, and Jurisprudence)
  • Honors Education and Practices

Please read the detailed strand descriptions and the theme statement carefully before writing your proposal.

Roundtable Presentations

Proposers are encouraged to consider the ideas within this year’s theme, Finding Your Voice: Speaking Truth to Power, in their proposals. What topics and conversations can revolve around this theme? How can we use our voices effectively?

In addition to that, we would also like to receive proposals that have a direct relationship with Honors Programs. How has Honors enabled students to experiment, create, and expand their horizons? What activities help to strengthen the sense of community in a diverse program such as this? How can Honors help students find their voices with new courses, projects, and interdisciplinary activities? Honors Programs help students’ cultivate and strengthen their voices.

Proposers should be aware that roundtable discussions are meant as a way of direct interaction between students. Ideas should be exchanged by using the presenter’s initial proposal to start a conversation at the table. This is a distinct difference from paper presentations. Presenters craft remarks that allow for interaction amongst those sitting at the roundtable.

This year, students will also be asked to designate the strand their work belongs in. The strand descriptions are listed below.

  • Business, Economics & Technology
  • Education
  • History, Politics, & Culture
  • Language, Literature, & Philosophy
  • Mathematics, Sciences, & Health
  • Media and the Arts
  • Social Sciences (Sociology, Anthropology, Archeology, Geography, and Jurisprudence)
  • Honors Education and Practices

Please read the detailed strand descriptions and the theme statement carefully before writing your proposal.

Idea Exchange

The Idea Exchange provides an opportunity for conference attendees to share information about the exciting and innovative ideas they use in their programs. We invite students and faculty to highlight their unique practices at tabletop stations organized in thematic clusters throughout a large room. This is a fast-paced session that will run concurrently with the poster session.

The Idea Exchange provides an informal forum to engage in discussions about new and emerging practices that you have found effective in your honors program. Use creative tabletop displays and handouts to attract others and facilitate your conversations. This fast-paced session runs concurrently with poster sessions. Preference will be given to proposals that are about ideas and practices that are new, creative, and/or innovative; that document success; and that have a clear fit with this type of session.

Please select one of the following themes for your proposal:

  • Advising and mentoring
  • Communication strategies
  • Building community
  • Diversity and inclusion
  • Experiential learning
  • Programming and special events
  • Recruitment and marketing
  • Student leadership and involvement
  • Unique courses or course activities
  • Other

Art Gallery

NRHC is pleased to invite you to find your voice and speak truth to power through art. Artwork can include many genres: drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, digital art, and more. Artists will be invited to participate in a panel discussion as well as have their artwork displayed at the conference. 

Ideally, the subject of the artwork should somehow relate to the conference theme, Finding Your Voice: Speaking Truth to Power. The art show application requires you to provide the following information about your artwork: 

  • Description of the piece and how it relates to the conference theme
  • The size of the piece
  • Type of artwork (e.g., drawing, photograph, sculpture, painting, etc.)
  • Special requirements for display (e.g., easel, table, etc.)

Please be aware that you are responsible for transporting your artwork to Albany.

NOTE: Students who submit artwork may also submit a paper, poster, or roundtable proposal. It is not necessary that the artwork and proposal be connected in any way. Although you are not required to submit a proposal in addition to the artwork, you are encouraged to do so.